DV vs RDA

When viewing a product label on any food, one would logically expect that when a product label says 25% of the Daily Value (DV) of a vitamin or mineral, it also means, that it supplies 25% of the daily amount that is recommended you consume. But it does not; DV and the RDA recommended by the Institute of Medicine are not interchangeable terms or concepts and must not be confused with each other.
The foundational basis for Daily Values is dependent on averages of populations that did not take into account the different nutritional needs for males, females, infants, children, adults, and the elderly. Daily values can meet the needs of only 50% of the population with some below the RDA and others above.
As an illustration, the product label on a box of the ready-to-eat cereal, Go Lean Crunch, shows a potassium intake of 330 mg per serving and lists this at 9% of the Daily Value (DV). The RDA for potassium intake is 3000 mg for 1-3 year old children and 4700 mg for adults, and 9% of these two numbers are 270 and 423, and not 330. Nine percent of the DV is not equal to 9% of the RDA.

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RDA, which is the actual amount of a particular nutrient recommended for daily ingestion is based on gender and age differences and meets the dietary needs of 98% of the population.

Use the RDA for your daily diet

In contrast, the RDA, which is the actual amount of a particular nutrient recommended for daily ingestion is based on gender and age differences and meets the dietary needs of 98% of the population.
Although the Daily Values found on product labels may have some nutritional information about a food product relative to another product or overall diet, the committee responsible for the establishment of the daily values specifically states that the product label is not to be used for planning diets.
Relying on the Daily Values will systematically over or underestimate the actual nutrient intake from a serving, making many foods appear to be more nutritional than they actually are.
A product that contains 100% of the DV will still have only a 50% probability of meeting the recommended daily intake amounts for the general population. It is the RDA that is intended to be used as the targeted goal for individual daily intake of vitamins and minerals and not daily values.